Blood Sacrifice

On Monday night, Texas Lieutenant Governor Dan Patrick told Tucker Carlson that he and other older people would be willing to risk their lives to help the country “get back to work.” “Those of us who are 70 plus, we’ll take care of ourselves. But don’t sacrifice the country,” he said. “No one reached outContinue reading “Blood Sacrifice”

"Family Estrangement During a Pandemic," by Erin Taylor

Last June, I made the decision to cut off my Dad, who still lives in Oklahoma with my Mother and little sister. This week, in light of the fast spread and high death rate of Covid-19, I made the decision to open up lines of communication, in case my mother, an “essential” employee, catches Covid-19Continue reading “"Family Estrangement During a Pandemic," by Erin Taylor”

"Anxiety and Action Amid the Plague," by Lucy Diavolo

It was a cold, clear night on the bay as the boat headed south from Oakland. Athena, seated at the front of the small vessel, steadied her nervous knee with her hand. She told herself the chill was what made her shiver, but she wasn’t cold in a hazmat suit, even as they sped acrossContinue reading “"Anxiety and Action Amid the Plague," by Lucy Diavolo”

"Everybody’s TK for the TK," by Brent Cox

Lost in the headlines of the crisis was the death of the weekend, who passed away on March 14 at the age of maybe as much as 112. Who can say? It is popularly believed that the weekend was created in New England at a cotton mill in 1908 as a concession to some workersContinue reading “"Everybody’s TK for the TK," by Brent Cox”

"Self-Iso Brain Rot; Or, Does This Look Good?" by Harron Walker

According to [citation needed] Twitter, William Shakespeare wrote King Lear while he was quarantined because of the plague. Me? I made these cutoffs. Sure, they’re not as impressive as a play about a king (?) who lears (??), but it’s possible that, in the process of making them, I stumbled onto something far more culturallyContinue reading “"Self-Iso Brain Rot; Or, Does This Look Good?" by Harron Walker”

"Care Work In a Time of Crisis," by Katy and Martha

Katy, a daycare teacher in rural Connecticut, and Martha, a social worker in New York City, have been friends for more than ten years and sisters-in-law for five. Between coronavirus panic texts and family FaceTime sessions, the two interviewed each other about their care work jobs and workplace organizing in this chaotic time. Martha: What’sContinue reading “"Care Work In a Time of Crisis," by Katy and Martha”

"How To Play With Kids In Your Life Over Video Chat," by Susie Armitage

Here is a game you can play with a kid in your life over a video call:  Say, “Hey, I have a question for you.” Ask them: would you rather drink apple juice or grape juice?  Let’s say they go with “apple juice.” Now ask them if they would rather drink apple juice or bananaContinue reading “"How To Play With Kids In Your Life Over Video Chat," by Susie Armitage”

"Thrownness and Death in the Age of Pandemic," by Jon Mackenzie

He won’t hear the thing come in. It travels faster than the speed of sound. The first news you get of it is the blast. Then, if you’re still around, you hear the sound of it coming in. What if it should hit exactly—ahh, no—for a split second you’d have to feel the very point,Continue reading “"Thrownness and Death in the Age of Pandemic," by Jon Mackenzie”

"Friends," by Maha Ahmed

For the last week, the only person I love who I’ve been able to see in real life is my roommate. This afternoon, that changed. A dear friend of mine has been going on runs in the neighborhood, waving to friends in third-floor walk-ups from the sidewalk; today they ran to my stoop. We stoodContinue reading “"Friends," by Maha Ahmed”